EPA Method 405.1


ALS - Columbia offers EPA Method 405.1 testing at these laboratories:

Jacksonville Jacksonville, Florida Laboratory

Method information displayed is provided for informational purposes only. No warranty (express or implied) is made as to the website accuracy, completeness, or applicability (such as the age of a method and whether or not it applies to your project). Please contact us for assistance. Analytical testing dots

PDF IconView Actual EPA Method 405.1 (PDF File)


EPA Method 405.1:
Biochemical Oxygen Demand. Official Name: Biochemical Oxygen Demand (5 days, 20oC)

Summary:
The BOD test is an empirical bioassay-type test which measures the dissolved oxygen consumed by microbial life while assimilating and oxidizing organic matter in a sample. A waste sample (or dilution) is incubated for five days 20oC in the dark. Dissolved oxygen is measured before and after incubation using a modified Winkler or oxygen probe method (e.g., EPA Method 360.2 and 360.1). The reduction in dissolved oxygen during the incubation period yields a measure of BOD.

Scope:
This test for BOD is used to determine the relative oxygen requirements of municipal and industrial wastewaters.

Citation:
Methods for the Chemical Analysis of Water and Wastes (MCAWW) (EPA/600/4-79/020)

Interferences:
None Provided.

QC Requirements:
None.

Maximum Holding Time:
48 hours (MCAWW, Table 1).

Media:
WATER

Subcategory:
Organic

Concentration:
See EPA Methods 360.1 and 360.2 for general information on the range of dissolved oxygen methods.

Sample Prep:
None.

Precision:
Precision and accuracy values were calculated using interlaboratory data from EPA-managed Water Pollution (WP) performance evaluation studies.

Detection:
None.

Revision Number:
Issued 1971; Editroial Revision 1974

Test Description:
Biochemical Oxygen D

Report Number:
600/4-79-020

Instrument used for this test:
DOMeter

Analytical testing dots


Examples:  8260
TO-15

Examples:  Dioxin
Mercury
Analytical testing dots


<-- Search All Test Methods



Suggestions? The test methods page continues to expand and improve. If you have suggestions for improvement, we would enjoy hearing from you. Please contact the webmaster here.


Analytical testing dots