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Posts Tagged ‘emissions’

New Rule Proposed for Emissions from Sewage Sludge Incinerators

Wednesday, October 27th, 2010

Sewage Sludge IncineratorThe EPA has proposed new rules directed at emissions from sewage sludge incinerator (SSI) units. SSI units are typically found at wastewater treatment facilities and, according to the EPA, are the sixth-largest source of mercury air emissions in the US. The proposal not only limits mercury emissions, but also sets standard and emission guidelines for eight other pollutants, including lead, cadmium, hydrogen chloride, particulate matter, carbon monoxide, dioxins and furans, nitrogen oxide, and sulfur dioxide. However, mercury is of particular interest because the proposed emission standard is more stringent than the mandates that were set under the Clean Air Act.

Learn more about Mercury emissions from sewage incinerators…

EPA Set to Regulate Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Monday, July 26th, 2010

by Brian Lewis, Ph. D

EPA Set to Regulate GHG Emissions

The regulation of greenhouse gases (GHG) has had a contentious history and continues to be a topic of much debate. The debated topics range from what agency should be in charge of GHG regulations to whether GHG needs to be regulated at all.

On June 10, the U.S. Senate voted 53-47 against a resolution of disapproval that would have stripped the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of the authority to regulate GHGs under the Clean Air Act.1-3 The resolution’s defeat paved the way for the EPA to regulate GHG emissions from both new automobiles and stationary sources. The EPA has now enacted rules that would require large-scale GHG producers to acquire permits.

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How to Determine Metals Emissions by EPA Method 29

Monday, April 26th, 2010

By Ed Wallace, Project Chemist, Kelso, WAEPA Method 29

EPA Method 29 measures hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions from stationary sources for mercury and other metals. The Clean Air Act (CAA) requires all major sources to meet HAP emission standards reflecting the application of maximum achievable control technology (MACT). These sources include industrial, commercial, and institutional boilers and process heaters. The other metals to be tested are antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, manganese, nickel, phosphorus, selenium, thallium and zinc.

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Nitrogen Dioxide Standard Released by EPA

Monday, April 19th, 2010

Nitrogen-Dioxide-Public-Health EPA released a new National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in January. This new one-hour standard is aimed to protect public health from peak short-term exposures, especially along busy city streets and highways where NO2 exposure is the most likely. According to the EPA, NO2 exposure has been linked to impaired lung function and increased respiratory infections, especially in people with asthma.

NO2 is one of a group of highly reactive gasses. It forms quickly from emissions from cars, trucks, buses, power plants, and off-road equipment. In addition, NO2 contributes to the development of ground-level ozone and fine particle pollution.

Read more about the nitrogen dioxide standard…

Hydrogen Sulfide to be Reported for Toxic Release Inventory

Monday, March 29th, 2010

Hydrogen SulfideEPA has announced plans to require reporting for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and is accepting public comments until April 27, 2010. Under the Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) requirements of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), the EPA will require H2S reporting estimates of all on-site releases and off-site transfers for disposal by each facility that meets the manufacture thresholds for hydrogen sulfide. Manufacturing limits for H2S emissions are 25,000 pounds per year, process limits are 25,000 pounds per year, and “other” use is 10,000 pounds per year.

Read more about hydrogen sulfide…

Air Emissions from Industrial Diesel Engines now Regulated by EPA

Wednesday, February 24th, 2010

Industrial Diesel EngineThe EPA aims to reduce air emissions from certain stationary diesel engines and issued their first standards on February 17, 2010. The rule will help reduce formaldehyde, benzene, acrolein and other toxic air pollutants from diesel powered stationary reciprocating internal combustion engines (RICE), also known as compression ignition (CI) engines. The toxic air pollutants, also referred to as hazardous air pollutants or air toxics, are suspected of causing cancer and other serious health effects as well as environmental damage.

EPA estimates that the rule will reduce annual toxic air emissions by 1,000 tons, particle pollution by 2,800 tons, carbon monoxide emissions by 14,000 tons, and organic compound emissions by 27,000 tons when fully implemented in 2013.

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