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Posts Tagged ‘MACT’

Analytical Techniques for MACT Industrial Boilers Emissions Standards

Sunday, February 5th, 2006

On September 13, 2004, the EPA promulgated Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) emissions standards for industrial boilers. Emission limits were established for total selected metals (TSM), mercury (Hg), and hydrochloric acid (HCl). The heat content and moisture content of the fuel is also discussed in the rule. The regulations include site-specific fuel analysis plans to demonstrate compliance. The regulations specify approved procedures for sample collection, sample processing, sample preparation, and chemical analysis. The approved methods are shown in Table 6 of the boiler MACT rule. The regulations also allow the use of equivalent methods and alternative methods. In order to meet site-specific emission limits, equivalent and alternative methods are often used in the fuel analysis plan. When alternative test methods are used a written request seeking approval of its use must be submitted to the EPA. The compliance date for these industrial boilers is September 13, 2007. Compliance can be demonstrated by fuel testing or with stack testing in combination with fuel testing.

This article is divided into two parts: recommended solid fuel testing techniques and recommended stack testing techniques for compliance with boiler MACT regulations.

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Measurement of Trace Level Mercury by EPA Method 1631

Wednesday, February 4th, 2004

Measurement-of-Trace-Leve--Mercury-by-EPA-Method-1631Mercury is responsible for over three-quarters of all contaminant-related advisories for threats to human health. During the 1990’s, the number of mercury related fish consumption advisories more than doubled, despite significant decreases in the total mercury emissions over the last 20 years. The increase in advisories is probably the result of more testing rather than more contamination.

While the contamination is showing up in lakes and fish, most mercury does not come from effluent, rather is derived from atmospheric deposition. Atmospheric transport and subsequent bioaccumulation of mercury can affect aquatic ecosystems far from mercury sources. According to EPA estimates, emissions from coal-fired utilities account for 13 to 26 percent of the total (natural plus anthropogenic) airborne emissions of mercury in the United States. Thus, the EPA has begun to regulate emissions from power plant boilers and process heaters.

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