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Posts Tagged ‘RCRA’

Saccharin Removed from EPA’s Hazardous Substance List

Wednesday, December 15th, 2010

SaccharinThe EPA has officially removed saccharin and its salts from their list of hazardous constituents and commercial chemical products. In a December 14, 2010 release, the EPA stated that saccharin is no longer considered a potential hazard to human health. Other substances on this list are still considered hazardous.

Read more about saccharin removal…

New Regulations Proposed for Coal Ash

Monday, July 19th, 2010

Proposed Regulations for Coal Ash

Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the EPA has proposed a rule that would regulate coal combustion residuals (CCR) for the first time.

CCRs, commonly known as coal ash, are residues captured from the combustion of coal at power plants and are typically disposed of at large surface impoundments in liquid (wet or slurried) form and at landfills in solid (dry) form. CCRs are currently considered exempt wastes under an RCRA amendment.

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EPA Proposes to Remove Saccharin from Hazardous Waste Lists

Monday, June 14th, 2010

EPA Proposes to Remove Saccharin from Hazardous Waste ListsIn April 2010, the EPA announced that there is sufficient data to support the removal of saccharin and its salts from the agency’s lists of hazardous wastes, hazardous constituents, and hazardous substances through the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). These substances no longer meet the criteria for hazardous waste regulation.

Saccharin is a white crystalline powder that is about 300 times sweeter than sucrose. It is typically available in the acid form (saccharin) or as salts (sodium saccharin or calcium saccharin). The most common uses are in diet soft drinks, table-top sweeteners, syrups, juices, chewing gums, and jellies. It is also used in personal-care products (e.g. toothpaste, mouthwash, dental cleaners, lipstick), pharmaceuticals (e.g. coatings on pills), and electroplating (e.g. brightener in nickel-plating baths).

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Proposed Rules and Standards Affecting Air Emissions

Monday, June 7th, 2010

Proposed Rules and Standards Affecting Air EmissionsOn April 29, 2010, the EPA announced two proposed air toxics standards: (1) an amendment to emission guidelines and new source performance standards, and (2) proposed new rules to clearly define and identify solid and non-solid, non-hazardous secondary materials.

The two air toxic standards will affect emissions from industrial, commercial, and institutional boilers and process heaters. One is written for major source facilities, which are those that emit or have the potential to emit 10 or more tons per year of any single air toxin or over 25 tons per year of any combination of air toxins. The second is for area source facilities that emit less than 10 tons per years of a single air toxin or less than 25 tons of any combination.

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Hexavalent Chromium in Aqueous Samples Containing Color and Chemical Interferences

Friday, February 4th, 2005

Hexavalent-Chromium-in-Aqueous-Samples-Containing-Color-and-Chemical-InterferencesBackground
Today there are two common colorimetric techniques using a Diphenylcarbazide (DPC) solution for determining Hexavalent Chromium (Cr+6) in RCRA site water samples. EPA Method 7196, a colormetric method, analyzes the untreated or filtered sample as is. EPA Method 7199, an ion chromatographic method, separates the Cr+6 ion from interferences and is then followed by post column reaction with DPC. Therefore, colored matrices or matrices containing chemical interferences may be better analyzed by ion chromatography as shown in the following example.

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