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Posts Tagged ‘rule’

Lead Paint: The EPA’s New Rule

Tuesday, August 24th, 2010

By Steve Wing

Lead Paint The EPA's New Rule

The Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Lead: Renovation, Repair, and Painting Rule, issued in 2008, was to take formal (enforceable) effect on April 22, 2010. However, due to difficulties with compliance, the EPA has extended this deadline to December 30, 2010.

This rule mandates a number of specific practices for contractors to mitigate the health hazards associated with disturbance of lead-based painted surfaces in homes, child care facilities, and schools constructed prior to 1978.1 Under this rule, all contractors in the U.S. conducting work on lead-based painted surfaces are required to be EPA certified and to follow specified work practices for preparation, clean-up, and record keeping. Painters, plumbers, electrical workers, general contractors, and a miscellany of other service providers will be affected. The rule applies to the disturbance of lead-based painted interior surfaces of six or more square feet and exterior surfaces of 20 square feet or more. Guidelines are also provided for window replacement and demolition in such facilities and homes. Under the statute, contractors not in compliance could be fined as much as $37,500 a day.2

Read more about EPA’s lead paint rule…

New Disinfectants Rule Deadlines for Public Water Systems

Wednesday, March 10th, 2010

Public Water Systems
This article describes the background, stages and the new deadlines for public water systems to comply with the most current disinfectants and disinfection byproducts rule.

By Dr. Harlan H. Bengtson, PE

 

 

Background on Disinfection and Disinfection Byproducts

Jersey City, NJ was the first U.S. city to routinely disinfect its municipal water supply, starting in 1908.1 Soon after, thousands of cities and towns across the country began to do the same and this dramatically decreased the prevalence of waterborne diseases such as cholera and typhoid. To demonstrate, the incidence rate of typhoid fever in the U.S. dropped from about 100 cases per 100,000 people in 1900 to 33.8 cases per 100,000 people in 1920.2 By 2006, this rate had dropped to 0.1 cases per 100,000 people.3

Read more about disinfectants rule…